CannabinoidsA Guide To Growing Hemp Flower In Vermont

Overview

Loamy well-drained soils are common in the Vermont region. Ideal for gardening and excellent for CBD flower growers. The humid, continental climate is excellent for gardening and will deliver great crops.

Plant Hardiness Zone(s)

The state of Vermont is largely classified as a 4a and 4b hardiness zone although there are a few pockets of 5a in the southern regions with a 5b recently being added in the southeast. Hemp prefers warmer growing conditions and is, therefore, more suitable for hemp flower cultivation in the south of Vermont.

Thermal Profile

Vermont falls in the North Temperate thermal zone which means that it generally has cool to mild weather conditions. CBD flower prefers warmer climatic conditions and it is, therefore, optimal to grow hemp in the summer months between late June and late September.

Length of Growing Season

Vermont has an estimated period of 155 days between the thawing of the last frost and appearance of the first frost. Hemp flower takes around 110 days to reach maturation making the ideal planting time in late Spring when soil temperatures have warmed up. Hemp will only reach the end of the growing cycle when the length of the day decreases to 12 hours. Harvesting is generally recommended within 8 days of maturation which should occur in mid to late August.

Average Annual Sunlight

On average, Vermont receives 2,406 days of sunlight in a year meaning that almost 60% of daylight hours are sunny. Hemp flower is heliotropic which means it thrives in sunny conditions and ensuring that a crop receives maximum sunlight during the growing season is essential.

Average Annual Precipitation

Vermont receives an average annual rainfall of almost 37 inches. Hemp flower requires between 10 and 12 inches of rainfall in the growing season. Hemp farmers do need to be aware that early, heavy rains can result in compacted soil conditions that are not favorable for hemp cultivation.

Surface Elevation

Vermont has an average elevation of 1000 ft above sea level. However, this is a mountainous state and peak elevations can reach as high as 3000 to 4000 ft. Hemp flower is famously hardy and adaptable and suitable for growing at most elevations and thrive in mountainous regions. However, it is important to pay attention to temperatures at higher elevations and adapt these to planting times.

Soil pH

Limestone and calciferous rock in Vermont result in a lower pH level than that of the surrounding state. Hemp likes soils that are pH balanced to slightly alkaline (6-7) making the soil in this state ideally suited to hemp flower farming.

Soil Composition

Soil is typically deep in Vermont which is Preferable for hemp plants that prefer to grow a long taproot to reach nutrients buried deep beneath the surface. Loose soil conditions are also optimal with minimal flooding or overly wet, compacted soil occurring in North Dakota.

Notable Pests

Common pests that could be detrimental to hemp crops in North Dakota include Potato Leafhopper, Rootworm, Cutworm and Armyworm. Alfalfa weevils are also making an appearance in the region although it is relatively unknown as to how this will affect hemp. Mites and aphids are specifically problematic to hemp plants. Pesticides should not be sprayed after flowering of a hemp crop has started.

Obtaining A Hemp Flower Grower’s License In Vermont

Under federal law, it is illegal to grow hemp flower anywhere in the United States without first obtaining a grower’s license from the appropriate regulatory body for the state in which the interested party intends to plant the crop. For information on the legal status of hemp in Vermont, as well as a breakdown of the application process, click here. Read about hemp legality by state.

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