CannabinoidsA Guide To Growing Hemp Flower In Indiana

Overview

Indiana is segmented into 3 distinct regions, the Southern Plains and Lowlands, Till Plains, Great Lakes Plains. Here’s a look at whether it is possible to grow high quality hemp crops in this part of the country.

Plant Hardiness Zone(s)

Indiana falls into 3 hardiness zones, 5b to 6b, as per the USDA plant hardiness map. Hemp on the other hand is a zone 8 to 11 hardy plant. This means that growing it outdoors throughout the year in this part of the country is not possible as it cannot tolerate the minimum winter temperatures. 

Thermal Profile

On average, the growing season in the state is 170 days long. The last frost may be seen as early as the beginning of April in some parts, while the first frost usually appears in October. The hemp growing season is usually 120 days long. Frost can kill young hemp plants, even though it does not have much of an impact on the quality of stalks that are ready for harvest. 

Length of Growing Season

On average, the growing season in the state is 170 days long. The last frost may be seen as early as the beginning of April in some parts, while the first frost usually appears in October. The  hemp growing season is usually 120 days long. Frost can kill young hemp plants, even though it does not have much of an impact on the quality of stalks that are ready for harvest. 

Average Annual Sunlight

Indiana receives about 2,440 hours of sunlight each year. Since hemp plants need more than 12 hours of sunshine each day to maximize their growth during the vegetative stage, growers need to choose the perfect time to plant. The plants start producing flowers when daily daylight periods go below 12 hours.

Average Annual Precipitation 

The average annual precipitation in the state is about 40.62 inches; with the annual average in the southern part being around 47 inches, and 37 inches in the north. The wettest month of the year is May while February is the driest. Hemp’s minimum annual average rainfall requirements fall between 25 and 30 inches. The plant’s water intake is highest during the earlier stages of growth.

Surface Elevation

The state’s mean elevation is 700 feet. Hoosier Hill, standing at 1,257 feet is the highest point in the state, while the point at which the Ohio and Wabash rivers meet is the lowest, at 320 feet above sea level. Hemp plants should be grown at altitudes lower than 600 to 800 feet above sea level.

Soil pH

Most Indiana soils have a pH of 7.2 to 7.6 or even higher. This is mainly due to the fact that the base layer rock in most parts of the state is limestone which makes the soil pH alkaline. Hemp does well in soils with a pH of 7.5 to 6.

Soil Composition

South-central Indiana soils do not hold water well due to the underlying limestone. Eastern-central soils on the other hand are clayey in nature and have poor drainage. Central and west-central soils are the most fertile in the entire state, while northern soils are sandy, and therefore too porous.

Notable Pests

Some of the common threats, in the form of pests, to hemp plants in the state of Indiana include borers, aphids, and spider mites as well as bacterial, viral, and fungal pathogens.

Obtaining A Hemp Grower’s License In Indiana

Under federal law, it is illegal to grow hemp anywhere in the United States without first obtaining a grower’s license from the appropriate regulatory body for the state in which the interested party intends to plant the crop. For information on the legal status of hemp in Indiana, as well as a breakdown of the application process, click here. Read about hemp legality by state.

AL AK AZ AR CA CO CT DE FL GA HI ID IL IN IA KS KY LA ME MD MA MI MN MS MO MT NE NV NH NJ NM NY NC ND OH OK OR PA RI SC SD TN TX UT VT VA WA WV WI WY DC